Govt is pumping more millions into cleaning up contaminated sites and (more challenging) reducing livestock emissions

Buzz from the Beehive

David Parker and Damien O’Connor separately announced environmental projects calling for investments of millions of dollars.

But how many millions of dollars?

The price tag for the clean-up of six contaminated sites – $2.08 million’s – was mentioned in the last sentence of Parker’s press release of almost 500 words.

O’Connor mentioned much bigger numbers – but was imprecise about the public funding involved in this particular initiative – when he announced the signing of a memorandum of understanding by Government with agribusiness leaders, in a joint venture as part of the new Centre for Climate Action on Agricultural Emissions.

The two ministerial announcements have been posted on the Beehive website along with news of ministers …

  • Leaving New Zealand to inspect the troops and hobnob with leaders in the Middle East

Defence Minister Peeni Henare – who  has departed for the Middle East- will

    1. visit New Zealand Defence Force personnel deployed within the region, including in Operation Gallant Phoenix in Jordan and the Multinational Force and Observers mission on the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt; and
    2. Engage in bilateral meetings with his counterparts in Egypt, Jordan and the United Arab Emirates.

The Minister will be joined on the visit by Commander Joint Forces New Zealand, Rear Admiral Jim Gilmour. The delegation returns to New Zealand on 12 October.

  • Promoting the Fijian language

Vosa Vakaviti is being celebrated by the Fijian community in New Zealand during Macawa ni Vosa Vakaviti – Fijian Language Week, which got underway yesterday.

“This year’s theme, ‘Me vakabulabulataki, vakamareqeti, ka vakaqaqacotaki na vosa Vakaviti’, which translates as ‘Nurture, Preserve and Sustain the Fijian language’, is particularly relevant as Fiji and the wider Pacific region navigate their recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic and the ever-increasing impacts of climate change,” Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio said.

Fijian Language Week runs from October 2-8. Visit the MPP website for more information and resources.

David Parker, announcing funding to clean up six contaminated sites to reduce the risk to public health and protect the environment, said the new allocations from the Contaminated Sites Remediation Fund (CSRF) address historical contamination, which in many cases started in the Nineteenth Century.

The funds are for projects that relate to:

  • a former landfill in Christchurch
  • a former landfill in Bluff
  • an old gasworks site in Oamaru
  • two former gold mines in Thames/Coromandel
  • a former defence site at Awaroa/Godley Head near Lyttelton Harbour

“Through the Contaminated Sites Remediation Fund, we direct support to priority contaminated sites, supporting local government to meet their obligations,” David Parker said.   

The $2.08 million funding from the Contaminated Sites Remediation Fund for the six projects will be bolstered by $1.55m from project partners, for a total of $3.63m across the projects.

Damien O’Connor said the Ministry for Primary Industries signed the memorandum of understanding alongside representatives from ANZCO Foods, Fonterra, Ngāi Tahu Holdings, Ravensdown, Silver Fern Farms and Synlait.

He reiterated the Government’s commitment to reducing agricultural emissions and said the joint venture by government and industry would get the new tools and technology that are needed into the hands of farmers “as soon as possible”.

But the numbers he bandied to give us an idea of the public spending were somewhat imprecise.

“It will be a long-term partnership with industry funding being matched by the Government.

“Initial indicative commitments would see around $172 million invested over the next four years by industry and government to develop and commercialise practical tools and technologies for farmers. 

“That includes $7.75 million by industry this financial year alone.”

The joint venture is a key component of the Centre for Climate Action on Agricultural Emissions.

The Centre was announced as part of the $338.7 million in funding allocated over the next four years to strengthen the role of research and development for new tools and technologies to reduce on-farm emissions which was announced in Budget 2022. This includes the Government’s funding component of the joint venture.

O’Connor said New Zealand could be – and should be – a leader in developing innovative tools and technologies to reduce emissions on-farm “and be the one other countries can look to”.

The agriculture sector contributes 50 per cent of Aotearoa New Zealand’s gross greenhouse gas emissions, and around 91 per cent of our biogenic methane emissions.

The Government has committed to a net-zero target for 2050 and reducing biogenic methane emissions by 10 per cent by 2030, relative to 2017 levels, and 24 to 47 per cent lower by 2050.

This Government likes to set itself a good challenge.  It has also set a target of zero road deaths and serious injuries by 2050, and a 40 per cent reduction by 2030.

Latest from the Beehive

3 OCTOBER 2022

Minister of Defence departs for Middle East

Minister of Defence Peeni Henare has today departed for the Middle East where he will visit New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) personnel deployed within the region.

Release

2 OCTOBER 2022

Government funds work to clean up six contaminated sites

The Government has announced funding to clean up six contaminated sites to reduce the risk to public health and protect the environment.

Government partners with industry to reduce agricultural emissions

New Zealand’s effort to reduce agricultural emissions has taken a step forward with the signing of a memorandum of understanding by Government with agribusiness leaders, in a joint venture as part of the new Centre for Climate Action on Agricultural Emissions.

Vosa Vakaviti sustains generations of Fijians

The enduring strength and sustainability of Vosa Vakaviti is being celebrated by the Fijian community in Aotearoa New Zealand during Macawa ni Vosa Vakaviti – Fijian Language Week, which gets underway today.

2 thoughts on “Govt is pumping more millions into cleaning up contaminated sites and (more challenging) reducing livestock emissions

  1. Livestock due not cause net carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is taken in by plants through the process of photosynthesis. The greenery is eaten by livestock, which emit carbon dioxide that is again absorbed by plants. It is a circular process, that even reduces carbon dioxide in NZ through the meat that we sell abroad. Methane is a short-lived gas and thus has no affect on the atmosphere. Why does the government keep pushing this lie about livestock increasing global warming. They are not idiots but they are bloody liars, WHY ?

    Like

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