Dyson gets gong for work for people with disabilities – but a blogger recalls what happened to sheltered workshop in Hutt

Ruth Suzanne Dyson, a former Labour Cabinet Minister, was among the recipients of Queen’s Birthday honours announced yesterday.  She is to become a Members of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services as a Member of Parliament and to people with disabilities.

But whoa there, says Lindsay Mitchell on her blog – Dyson deserves diddly squat

She recalled Dyson as …

The minister who forced the minimum wage on sheltered workshops in 2005.

She was warned about the effect but bullocked on.

Point of Order suspects Mitchell was referring to the repeal in 2007 of the Disabled Persons Employment Promotion 1960, which had exempted sheltered workshops and similar enterprises from affording their disabled clients minimum employment conditions, particularly the minimum wage.

Under the new legislation, employment opportunities for people with disabilities in segregated settings would continue, but wages would  be paid according to the work people did rather than the place where people worked.

Four years ago a RNZ Spectrum documentary examined the consequences of this repeal.  Continue reading “Dyson gets gong for work for people with disabilities – but a blogger recalls what happened to sheltered workshop in Hutt”

How Covid is working through markets: British Airways edition

Because markets clear supply and demand, abrupt shocks often lead to surprising outcomes.  Covid is a big market shock.  

An early example of the ‘I didn’t think of that’ genre comes from world aviation. British Airways is taking advantage of the collapse of air traffic to restructure its workforce. Continue reading “How Covid is working through markets: British Airways edition”

Nurses won lots of sympathy – but who says tax collectors are invaluable?

A press release from the PSA at 9:32 am  which advised IR and MBIE workers on strike TODAY.

WHEN: Today, Monday 23 July, 1pm – 3pm

WHERE: Various locations around New Zealand (see below)

WHAT: 4000 PSA members from IR and MBIE take strike action

The statement advised that PSA members at Inland Revenue and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment “will reluctantly hold a second day of strike action today”. Continue reading “Nurses won lots of sympathy – but who says tax collectors are invaluable?”

Fair wage plans are upsetting for some on the left, too

Some business people are uneasy about Government proposals to introduce fair pay agreements. Far-left commentators – as it happens – aren’t too chuffed about what’s going on, either.

Their concerns are encapsulated in the headline on a weekend post at Scoop which shrilly warns: Labour government to extend bans on strikes

Beneath the headline, John Braddock, from the Socialist Equality Group, complains that New Zealand’s Labour Party-led government has “defrauded” voters by preparing to further restrict the right to strike for broad sections of workers when it overhauls the country’s industrial laws.

If you read on, you will learn more about who are the goodies and baddies in the formulation of labour market policy, as viewed through a Socialist Equality Group prism, than about anything  the Government wants to hide from us.  Continue reading “Fair wage plans are upsetting for some on the left, too”

Maybe a fair wage model is better found by taking a steer from Mainfreight

Workplace Minister Iain Lees-Galloway scored something of a political  coup when he enlisted  former PM Jim Bolger to head the Fair  Pay Agreement Working  Group   which will make recommendations on the  design of a  sector-level bargaining system.

Bolger thus has  a  key role in  shaping Labour’s policy on  “fair-pay” agreements.

It  is an understatement to say National mandarins were hardly chuffed by Bolger’s enthusiasm  for the  task.  National strongly opposes Labour’s plan which – in effect – turns the clock back on industrial  bargaining. Continue reading “Maybe a fair wage model is better found by taking a steer from Mainfreight”