The Nats won’t want Jones fired – not when voters would be robbed of the chance to bridle at being wooed with public funds

Cabinet  Minister  Shane  Jones   is under fire  for  promising  utu against the whistleblower  who told the NZ Herald about his comments at the forestry awards evening.

Jones, adopting Donald Trump’s technique, says he knows who went to the Herald and he’s going to “deal to them”.

“When the election comes around and the Cabinet restrictions have been loosened, then I am personally going to deal to these National Party sympathisers who thought that it was a smart idea to try and have me quivering in a corner by racing to the media.At the appropriate time, I will deal to them as a big-time, NZ First wrestler.”

Commentators  as   diverse  as  Peter  Dunne   and   Heather du Plessis-Allan reckon he has  over-stepped  the mark. Continue reading “The Nats won’t want Jones fired – not when voters would be robbed of the chance to bridle at being wooed with public funds”

Whistle-blowing, Trump’s treason tweets and the impeachment process – does this pave the way for President Pence?

Shane Jones, PGF Minister, would go down well in Australian politics. He doesn’t shy from a bit of “biffo”. At times this works well and his audiences like it. He reckons he’s right as some of his recent forestry critics were arch-Tories, or so he says.

However, this reminds us how NZ politics are amazingly genteel.  Take this week’s events in the US.  First, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi announces the launch of an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. The process is under way.

Diligent readers of Point of Order know the score. The (lower) House conducts an inquiry (this one involves six committees) then passes the equivalent of the bill. This goes to the Senate which has to vote up or down on whether to launch a trial of the president. As the Republicans control the upper house there seems little chance anyone will break ranks. Continue reading “Whistle-blowing, Trump’s treason tweets and the impeachment process – does this pave the way for President Pence?”

Our PM is up there with Greta Thunburg in the running for this year’s Peace Prize

Ardern in running for Nobel  Peace  Prize”, the  headline in the  NZ Herald’s  Monday edition proclaimed.

We  learn  from the text  of  the accompanying comment piece  by  the  Professor of  Law  at  Waikato University, Alexander  Gillespie,  that the PM,  Jacinda  Ardern,  is  rated  as second favourite, but  a  bit  behind the front-runner, young climate change activist  Greta  Thunburg.

Gillespie  says  that  although  Ardern does not command the  same  global  media coverage as Thunburg,  the depth of her response  to the Christchurch massacre  on March 15 has made  her  in the eyes of  many the best  candidate for the  award.

The sincerity, empathy and compassion  she  displayed  towards the families and their  Muslim was unique in an age when tolerance, respect and reconciliation are  rare”. Continue reading “Our PM is up there with Greta Thunburg in the running for this year’s Peace Prize”

Broadcasters who have interviewed Marama Fox perhaps could help liquidators who can’t find her to serve papers

Liquidators of Marama Fox’s failed consulting company have had to engage agents to track down the former Maori Party leader, according to a Newsroom report today.

The report says creditors have claimed Fox owes them more than $111,000, which she said she planned to pay back through personal finance, soon after her company went into liquidation last year.

It also says Fox has not fronted up with any money and the company’s liquidator Grant Reynolds said he had not been able to get in contact with her for the past few months.

Reynolds said he now planned to serve legal proceedings against Fox, for a breach of her duties as a director.

However, he was not able to serve her with the papers to launch the proceedings without knowing where she was.

Some people believed Fox had moved to Australia, and a photo on her Facebook page pointed to her being in Australia at some point during the year. Continue reading “Broadcasters who have interviewed Marama Fox perhaps could help liquidators who can’t find her to serve papers”

Britain’s Supreme Court on trial?

Britain’s highest court is hearing arguments this week over the legality of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s prorogation of Parliament earlier this month.  Its decision is unlikely to shift entrenched views – and may not make much difference to the path or outcome of Brexit.

But a piece in The Times by political commentator Daniel Finkelstein suggests that it may be of the greatest importance for the Supreme Court itself.  In his view, the hearings “may mark the moment Britain stopped being a political democracy restrained by law and became instead a legal democracy tempered by politics”.

Continue reading “Britain’s Supreme Court on trial?”

Warm welcome awaits Peters on his return from surgery, as Labour seeks to regroup

With the Labour Party in some disarray, Deputy PM Winston Peters may be surprised how warmly he is welcomed back in the Beehive when he returns.

Initially it was expected he would be absent for not much more than a week after he took leave on August 19 for surgery to what was said to be a recurrence of an “old rugby injury”. Continue reading “Warm welcome awaits Peters on his return from surgery, as Labour seeks to regroup”