The discounting of Cook’s claims to a famous first – but who drew the first map of NZ?

Moana Jackson, described as a “Te Tiriti specialist” in a recent Stuff report, dismissed Tuia 250 as a load of humbug.

To celebrate the dual heritage of navigation across the Pacific, he contended, “then it wouldn’t be Tuia 250, it would be Tuia 2000 or something.”

More egregious, to “commemorate” Captain James Cook’s arrival in this country seems “weird” to Jackson:

“When it comes to explorers, you usually make a big deal of whoever did something first.

“Neil Armstrong is acknowledged as the first astronaut to land on the Moon. There’s no real celebration of the 12th astronaut to land on the Moon. And Cook wasn’t even the 12th navigator to sail across the Pacific.

“So I’m not sure what the baseline was for commemorating him – except that he has become an important part of the misremembering of colonising history.” Continue reading “The discounting of Cook’s claims to a famous first – but who drew the first map of NZ?”

The writing of history: RNZ sets the record straight by listening to modern-day iwi and discounting Cook’s journals

Radio New Zealand journalist Meriana Johnsen – without any hint of a blush, we imagine – reported that “Gisborne iwi are setting the record straight on Captain James Cook…”

In other words, we have been told this is what really happened when Cook and his crew first  arrived in New Zealand.

These Gisborne iwi – and Johnsen perhaps – will now be awaiting their invitations to contribute to the history books to be introduced to our schools.

Johnsen’s report is headlined “Gisborne iwi on British ‘collisions’: ‘They started swimming away but Cook started shooting’.”

Cook started shooting?

Not his crewmen? Continue reading “The writing of history: RNZ sets the record straight by listening to modern-day iwi and discounting Cook’s journals”

Methane and interest rates – the things Brash can publicly discuss without upsetting the thought police

We haven’t spotted any expressions of outrage or dismay, in response to news that Don Brash is throwing his money and weight behind technology that could help to solve New Zealand’s methane headache.

According to Carbon News, the former National Party leader and Reserve Bank Governor is the sole outside investor in Zest Biotech, a family company commercialising technology developed by New Zealand horticultural scientist Nathan Balasingham

Balasingham last year was nominated for the prestigious World Technology Award in the Individual Biotechnology category for his products Biozest and Agrizest.

Anyone searching for a race angle to this story about Brash should note that Balasingham was born in Malaysia through Sri Lankan ancestry and graduated from Massey University with a Masters Degree in Horticultural Science with 1st class honours.

Armed with a PhD in economics as well as his RBNZ governorship experience, Brash stuck his head above the parapet again last week to express concerns after the Reserve Bank cut the official cash rate to 1.5%.  Continue reading “Methane and interest rates – the things Brash can publicly discuss without upsetting the thought police”