The govt pumps $24.2m into job programmes – but look how the Treaty (or something) has determined the allocations

Young Maori should do nicely, thank you, from funding numbers bandied today by Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni.

And non-Maori young people?

Sorry.  They don’t loom so large in the distribution of Sepuloni’s largess.    

The Minister announced that more than 800 jobseekers will be supported on pathways into employment, education and training through funding into the Māori Trades and Training Fund (MTTF) and He Poutama Rangatahi projects.

The numbers she bandied in dollars terms add up to $24.2 million.

But ethnicity will be the critical factor in determining who benefits.  The lion’s share of the investment, almost 77%, is going into the Māori Trades and Training Fund.

Sepuloni said this will support over 500 Māori job seekers into employment and training opportunities, with $18.576 million committed to a range of new and existing projects.

The rest of the nation’s young people can’t complain they have been overlooked.

The Government is investing $5.6 million to help over 300 young people overcome barriers to employment, education and training through further funding into He Poutama Rangatahi (and we assume non-Maori are intended to benefit from this programme). Continue reading “The govt pumps $24.2m into job programmes – but look how the Treaty (or something) has determined the allocations”

Fishing folk will be fuming after govt restricts activities in Hauraki Gulf – but greenies will be grumbling too

One of the government’s myriad of troughs has been replenished, new scholarships are being provided (for those who meet a race eligibility test), and Phil Twyford has delivered another speech about arms control.

Invitations to slurp at the trough are being issued to community organisations that can deliver energy education to households in need.  The money comes from the Support for Energy Education in Communities (SEEC) Programme.

$1.65 million is available in this second round.

In total, $7.91 million will be allocated through the SEEC Programme’s regular funding rounds until 2024.

The three new scholarships, for Maori students in vocational education and training (VET), are to be added to “the suite of prestigious Ngarimu scholarships”.

Over 300 scholarships have been awarded over the years to people such as VC medal recipient Willie Apiata, Māori academic Whatarangi Winiata, entrepreneur and Pīpī Mā founder Kristin Ross, and Māori language expert Pania Papa.

The Ngarimu VET Scholarships are worth $10,000 each. The closing date for the Ngarimu VET applications is September 1.

Twyford’s speech, to the AI Forum Executive, addressed the development of policy on autonomous weapons systems.

But here at Point of Order we suspect the issue that will generate the greatest debate –consternation in some circles – is the government’s announcement of new marine protection areas and significant restrictions on fishing.

Fishing folk are likely to be fuming at the effects of a raft of changes being put in place to protect the Hauraki Gulf. Continue reading “Fishing folk will be fuming after govt restricts activities in Hauraki Gulf – but greenies will be grumbling too”

Police budget was trimmed but $70m will be invested in scheme to let some offenders be dealt with by iwi panels

The Nats made political hay from the government’s treatment of the Police in this year’s budget.  The Police Budget was trimmed by around $90 million

“ … despite record growth in gang membership,” National’s Police spokesperson Simeon Brown says.

The government – inevitably – defended its numbers, saying some funds are still under negotiation, and the police are still better off than they were under National.

Today Police Minister Poto Williams made a fresh Budget announcement of new spending of $70 million in new operating funding.

It’s for Te Pae Oranga Iwi Community Panels, to provide more panels and ensure they are available to people across New Zealand.

This time the ACT’s Justice spokesperson Nicole McKee has rejoined that the Government will spend $70 million to go even softer on crime.

Te Pae Oranga Iwi Community Panels give police an option for dealing with people with underlying issues who need help to get their lives back on track. This includes helping them overcome problems like addiction, abuse, financial stress and difficulties getting employment or education. Continue reading “Police budget was trimmed but $70m will be invested in scheme to let some offenders be dealt with by iwi panels”

Prisoners with a flair for kapa haka are among the beneficiaries of the govt’s latest efforts to promote our wellbeing

Our Beehive bulletin

Enhancing the wellbeing of people banged up in our prisons was the subject of one Beehive announcement yesterday.  Enhancing the wellbeing of farm animals was the subject of another.  And enhancing the wellbeing of all of us by protecting us from terrorists was the subject of a statement from the PM.

Disarmament and Arms Control Minister Phil Twyford – more grandly – had the welfare of the whole world in his considerations when he addressed a workshop on lethal autonomous weapons systems.

From our monitoring of The Beehive website we learned –

  • Corrections Minister Kelvin Davis announced the joyous news that – for the first time – all 18 prisons in New Zealand will be invited to participate in an inter-prison kapa haka competition.
  • Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor brought less joyous news to some farmers when he announced the export of livestock by sea will cease following a transition period of up to two years. He acknowledged the economic benefit some farmers get from the trade, but I also noted that “support of it is not universal within the sector.”
  • The PM issued a stocktake undertaken by France and New Zealand which shows “significant global progress” under the Christchurch Call towards its goal to eliminate terrorist and violent extremist content online. 
  • Disarmament and Arms Control Minister Phil Twyford addressed a workshop on lethal autonomous weapons systems, explaining that New Zealand has strongly supported the development of 11 Guiding Principles by the Group of Governmental experts on this issue. He provided a snapshot of what New Zealand has done on this issue and where we stand now.
  • Racing Minister Grant Robertson announced he is appointing Liz Dawson as Chair of the interim TAB NZ Board.  The interim board is responsible for the governance of TAB New Zealand until the substantive board of directors is appointed. 

Continue reading “Prisoners with a flair for kapa haka are among the beneficiaries of the govt’s latest efforts to promote our wellbeing”