And on the 11th day, the govt moved with a sanctions package to show the world what we think of Putin’s war in Ukraine

The flow of news from The Beehive in recent days seems to have been aimed largely at enabling ministers to remind voters of their portfolio responsibilities and duties.

On International Women’s Day, for example, the Minister for the Prevention of Family Violence and Sexual Violence, Marama Davidson, joined with other women “to reinforce the need for collective action to address gender-based violence”.

The Minister for Children, Kelvin Davis, drew attention to the celebration of Children’s Day/ Te Rā o Ngā Tamariki by asking everyone to continue with crucial support for our young people as the fight with Covid continues.

 Pacific Peoples Minister Aupito William Sio announced the 2022 Pacific Language Weeks series, highlighting the contribution of those who have provided life-saving Covid-19 messages in the nine Pacific Island languages over the past two years.

Justice Minister Kris Faafoi reassured us the Government is “progressing” legislation to ensure that courts can continue operating safely and effectively as COVID-19 spreads in the community.

And Finance Minister Grant Robertson issued a ministerial statement to serve what looks like the  purpose of putting  down National Party leader Christopher Luxon, who had called for the government to give struggling Kiwis tax relief as the cost of living soars. Robertson rejoined that Kiwis had heard “the same tired old story” from Luxon that “fails to give any new ideas for our future”.

Then came something with a bit more heft. Continue reading “And on the 11th day, the govt moved with a sanctions package to show the world what we think of Putin’s war in Ukraine”

Covid policy divides NZ into two camps – further division (Us and Them) is created by invoking The Treaty

Latest from the Beehive

The government has taken further steps to split the country into various camps – first, we will have vaccinated and unvaccinated Kiwis, and second, we are further developing Us and Them racial camps.   One split is being explained by the government’s need to protect the nation against the spread of Covid-19, the other is being justified by a debatable interpretation of the Treaty of Waitangi.

When something must be done to meet the requirements of the Treaty (according to interpretations adopted by the Ardern government to promote its political agenda), most critics are likely to be silenced. To challenge the dispensation of favours to Maori or whatever has been justified by the Treaty is to risk being accused of racism.

The latest decision to split the country into vaccinated and unvaccinated camps – and to bestow rights and benefits, such as a job, on the vaccinated – affects Police and Defence personnel.

Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood announced that workplace vaccination requirements will be extended to include the New Zealand Police and Defence Force in preparation for the transition to the new COVID-19 Protection Framework on 3 December 2021. Continue reading “Covid policy divides NZ into two camps – further division (Us and Them) is created by invoking The Treaty”