Covid policy divides NZ into two camps – further division (Us and Them) is created by invoking The Treaty

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The government has taken further steps to split the country into various camps – first, we will have vaccinated and unvaccinated Kiwis, and second, we are further developing Us and Them racial camps.   One split is being explained by the government’s need to protect the nation against the spread of Covid-19, the other is being justified by a debatable interpretation of the Treaty of Waitangi.

When something must be done to meet the requirements of the Treaty (according to interpretations adopted by the Ardern government to promote its political agenda), most critics are likely to be silenced. To challenge the dispensation of favours to Maori or whatever has been justified by the Treaty is to risk being accused of racism.

The latest decision to split the country into vaccinated and unvaccinated camps – and to bestow rights and benefits, such as a job, on the vaccinated – affects Police and Defence personnel.

Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood announced that workplace vaccination requirements will be extended to include the New Zealand Police and Defence Force in preparation for the transition to the new COVID-19 Protection Framework on 3 December 2021. Continue reading “Covid policy divides NZ into two camps – further division (Us and Them) is created by invoking The Treaty”

Govt rushes freedom-crimping measures past close scrutiny – ministers then go spending big bucks to tackle Covid-19

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Fresh from the legislative outrage of rushing the “traffic lights” bill through Parliament, the government poured $504.1 million earlier today into initiatives to help Kiwis deal with Covid-19 in its latest responses to the reality that Covid-19 is something we must learn to live with.

That was the sum when Point of Order first checked the Beehive website this morning.

By the time we were wrapping up this post an announcement from Associate Health Minister Ayesha Verrall had increased this by almost $1 billion on measures for testing, contact tracing and case investigation

Quicker testing will be among the consequences.

“Delta is here, so we are ensuring we have the tools in place to support the transition to the new framework, and to help minimise the spread of COVID-19,” Ayesha Verrall said.

Yep.  The government has waved the flag of surrender in its efforts to beat the virus and has changed the rules for trying to constrain its spread.

Most controversially,  this is being done by constraining Kiwis freedoms – if they have not been vaccinated – under legislation which has been passed in indecent haste.  Continue reading “Govt rushes freedom-crimping measures past close scrutiny – ministers then go spending big bucks to tackle Covid-19”

Aucklanders (many of them, anyway) are to be freed from Covid curbs soon – but the rest of NZ has cause for anxiety

More than one announcement from the Beehive yesterday has the potential to affect the country’s health and general wellbeing in one way or another.

Justice Minister Kris Faafoi – for example – was chuffed about the the Three Strikes Legislation Repeal Bill passing its first reading in Parliament.

But critics fear this legislation  will put several of the worst criminals in New Zealand back on our streets over the next four years.

ACT Justice spokesperson Nicole McKee said:

“Three Strikes offenders make up just one per cent of all convictions, they have an average of 75 convictions, they are the worst and most violent offenders New Zealand has seen. They aren’t behind bars for petty theft or minor crimes. They have beaten, raped and murdered people.

“For every offence carried out by these people, there is a victim…” Continue reading “Aucklanders (many of them, anyway) are to be freed from Covid curbs soon – but the rest of NZ has cause for anxiety”

Maori Ministers announce $23.5m of vaccine spending – and RNZ raises questions about the causes of disparities

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How many Ministers are needed to announce the spending of millions of dollars on vaccinations for Maori?

The names of three Ministers were attached to the statement on October 22, announcing the Government has established a $120 million fund to accelerate Māori vaccination rates and support communities to prepare for the implementation of something it called “the new COVID-19 Protection Framework”.

The old framework had reached its use-by date, presumably.

The statement bore the names of the Associate Minister for Health (Maori Health), Peeni Henare, the Minister for Māori Crown Relations: Te Arawhiti, Kelvin Davis, and the Minister for Māori Development, Willie Jackson.

Among other things, they enthused at a commitment “to work with Māori providers, for a by Māori for Māori solution”.

The same three Ministers popped up today to announce the Government has approved $23.5 million from this funding for eight Māori organisations and iwi aimed at boosting Māori vaccination rates. Continue reading “Maori Ministers announce $23.5m of vaccine spending – and RNZ raises questions about the causes of disparities”

Govt to give ‘most vulnerable’ countries $1.3bn to deal with climate change, but how will the recipients be identified?

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Fresh from a weekend of hoopla and incentives (or palpable bribery) to lift the country’s Covid vaccination numbers, the Government turned to another great threat to our wellbeing and is splashing out on helping some countries deal with climate change.

It has committed $1.3 billion over four years “to support countries most vulnerable to the effects of climate change”.

At least 50 per cent of the funding will go to the Pacific as it adapts to the impacts of climate change.

Whether the countries that will benefit rank among the “most vulnerable countries” depends on which list you consult.

Point of Order asked Google to tell us which countries are most vulnerable to climate change.

Top of the list of about 178 million responses was an article which referenced the results of the Global Climate Risk Index 2020. Continue reading “Govt to give ‘most vulnerable’ countries $1.3bn to deal with climate change, but how will the recipients be identified?”