McAnulty mentions “democracy” as he braces to meet local authority leaders – and maybe he will dive into Three Waters issues

Buzz from the Beehive

Amidst a raft of statements that crow about government achievements and/or bray about new initiatives, Point of Order found an oddity:  a statement from the newly minted Associate Minister of Local Government who intends to meet local government leaders around the country to talk about this, that and …

Well, surely he will want to talk (if not listen) about Three Waters and explain the influence that will be wielded by the sister of his colleague,  Local Government Minister Nanaia Mahuta,

But the press statement only hinted that  Three Waters would be on the agenda.

The crowing and braying statements, of course, were much less puzzling. Continue reading “McAnulty mentions “democracy” as he braces to meet local authority leaders – and maybe he will dive into Three Waters issues”

The govt pumps $24.2m into job programmes – but look how the Treaty (or something) has determined the allocations

Young Maori should do nicely, thank you, from funding numbers bandied today by Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni.

And non-Maori young people?

Sorry.  They don’t loom so large in the distribution of Sepuloni’s largess.    

The Minister announced that more than 800 jobseekers will be supported on pathways into employment, education and training through funding into the Māori Trades and Training Fund (MTTF) and He Poutama Rangatahi projects.

The numbers she bandied in dollars terms add up to $24.2 million.

But ethnicity will be the critical factor in determining who benefits.  The lion’s share of the investment, almost 77%, is going into the Māori Trades and Training Fund.

Sepuloni said this will support over 500 Māori job seekers into employment and training opportunities, with $18.576 million committed to a range of new and existing projects.

The rest of the nation’s young people can’t complain they have been overlooked.

The Government is investing $5.6 million to help over 300 young people overcome barriers to employment, education and training through further funding into He Poutama Rangatahi (and we assume non-Maori are intended to benefit from this programme). Continue reading “The govt pumps $24.2m into job programmes – but look how the Treaty (or something) has determined the allocations”

Hipkins moves from dishing out free lunches to overseeing free health – and $10m is poured into the new “events” trough

There’s no such thing as a free lunch?

Tell that to Chris Hipkins, who is braying about Free lunches served up to thousands of school children in the South Island.

Mind you, he now will be enthusing about free health after landing the Health portfolio after David Clark’s resignation.

While we were tidying up this post, the PM announced she was appointing Hipkins as Health Minister “until the election”.  She said she had full confidence that Hipkins would oversee the portfolio “with the thoroughness and diligence he brings to his other areas of responsibility”.

Earlier this morning Hipkins was announcing that “the Government’s free and healthy school lunches programme” is moving south for the first time, creating jobs for around 30 people in Otago and Southland.

Details are sparse, but we assume Nelson, Marlborough, Canterbury and the West Coast have been bypassed in this push south. Continue reading “Hipkins moves from dishing out free lunches to overseeing free health – and $10m is poured into the new “events” trough”

There’s Budget money for the primary sector – but not nearly as much as for the tourist industry ($400m) or Maori ($900m)

A press statement that seemed to have missed the bus on Budget day was among the announcements, proclamation, edicts and what-have-you posted on the Beehive website yesterday.

It came from Agriculture and Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor who presumably wanted to show the rural community he has been earning his keep and that Budget 2020 makes major investments in the primary sector that will support more than 10,000 people into jobs.

But if we tot up the numbers in his statement, it’s not nearly as much major investment as the $900 million for Maori or the $400 million for the tourist industry.  Taxpayers (or will it come from the government’s lending sources?) will be called on to cough up – Continue reading “There’s Budget money for the primary sector – but not nearly as much as for the tourist industry ($400m) or Maori ($900m)”

Family Court: we thought Labour had the answers in 2014 but it now wants more advice

Justice Minister Andrew Little today welcomed the release of a public consultation paper by the Independent Panel considering the 2014 family justice reforms.  So should we all.

The panel is calling for public submissions, inviting everyone with experience of the family justice system to share their stories and have their say about how family justice services can be improved.

Among the changes introduced by Judith Collins as Justice Minister in 2014, mediation was required before parents could apply to the Family Court and lawyers were removed from the early stages of some court proceedings.

The aim was to help people resolve parenting disputes without having to go to court.

She said she expected the caseload would reduce significantly. Continue reading “Family Court: we thought Labour had the answers in 2014 but it now wants more advice”