The political payoff is plain but is it smart to borrow $219,512 per job (mostly temporary) to spruce up the Murihiku Marae?

The Point of Order Trough Monitor was triggered today by the announcement of a $9 million handout for Southlanders – sorry, some Southlanders.

The news came from the office of Grant Robertson who, as Minister of Finance, prefers to invest public money rather than give it away – especially when it is borrowed money which taxpayers eventually will be called on to repay.

Accordingly, wearing his “Infrastructure Minister” hat and in the company of Te Tai Tonga MP Rino Tirikatane, Robertson announced the Government is investing $9 million “to upgrade a significant community facility in Invercargill, creating economic stimulus and jobs”.

The only other news from the Beehive came from ACC Minister Carmel Sepuloni, who announced the appointments of three new members to join the Board of ACC on 1 February.

“All three bring diverse skills and experience to provide strong governance oversight to lead the direction of ACC” said Hon Carmel Sepuloni.

Of course they do. Continue reading “The political payoff is plain but is it smart to borrow $219,512 per job (mostly temporary) to spruce up the Murihiku Marae?”

Keeping up with Jones: Mahuta (to help marae) and Parker (for moana remediation ) are dab hands at dishing out millions, too

Our uncharitable suspicions have been allayed.  NZ First’s Shane Jones insists he is not feverishly dishing out millions of dollars in the last few days of the election campaign in a desperate effort to curry favour with voters.

He has described expressions of outrage over a $100 million boost for marae from the Provincial Growth Fund, announced this week as “tawdry”.

And let’s be fair –

  • Only some of the marae funding is bound for Northland, where Jones is campaigning for election – $9,287,603 of a total $96,515,895;
  • Labour’s Nanaia Mahuta attached her name to the joint announcement about the goodies for marae;
  • Environment Minister David Parker brought good news (and money) to the Far North, too. He signed a Memorandum of Understanding at Waihāua Marae between the Crown, local iwi and councils

“ … to protect, restore and enhance the mauri of Kaipara Moana in Northland”.

 Parker recalled that in this year’s Budget, as part of the Jobs for Nature package, the Government committed $100 million towards the remediation of Kaipara Moana, New Zealand’s largest estuarine ecosystem, with a matching $100 million contribution from local councils and landowners.

“The $200 million Kaipara Moana Remediation Programme will restore mauri to Kaipara Moana while at the same time creating local jobs and opportunities. Close to 100 jobs will be established in the first year alone,” David Parker said. 

The MOU is the catalyst to establish the Joint Committee between Kaipara Uri and the councils to govern the remediation programme. Continue reading “Keeping up with Jones: Mahuta (to help marae) and Parker (for moana remediation ) are dab hands at dishing out millions, too”

Ministers are now dipping into the PGF to help causes they deem worthy – marae in this case – in the big cities

The Beehive Bugle Brigade was light on ballyhoo yesterday, perhaps bargaining on their braying being wasted on a media that became fixed on the prospect of a leadership blood-letting in the National Party.

Attorney-General David Parker announced the promotion of Environment Judge David Kirkpatrick, of Auckland, to take over from Judge Laurie Newhook as the Principal Environment Judge on July 8.

And (a joint statement) Communications and Digital Media Minister Kris Faafoi and Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced the latest beneficiaries of the programme to connect marae around the country to the internet.

But wait.  This statement drew our attention to ministers serving some of the $3 billion of slops in the Provincial Growth Fund trough to big-city folk  – some big-city folk, at least Continue reading “Ministers are now dipping into the PGF to help causes they deem worthy – marae in this case – in the big cities”

Mollifying Maori Party president about discriminatory words would call for much rewriting of NZ law books

Point of Order has plucked a piece of legislation from the law books – the Fire and Emergency New Zealand Act 2017 – which mentions the power to enter homes and marae.

It says:

A FENZ inspector must not, except with the consent of an occupier or under a warrant, enter any land or building that is a home or a marae or a building associated with a marae.

We wonder if this is acceptable to the president of the Maori Party.

The Food Act contains provisions on marae food. 

This seems troublesome, too, after the Maori Party’s president was quoted as saying “prejudice” tainted the highly contentious Covid-19 Public Health Response Bill from the time it used a term that pertains to Māoridom.

Really?

Similarly, the Charities Act 2005 might be problematic. Continue reading “Mollifying Maori Party president about discriminatory words would call for much rewriting of NZ law books”