A Green dilemma – trying to square govt support for families with the degrading environmental consequences

With Green Party support, the Government will remove a disincentive to the population growth that experts reckon is the number one contributor to the degradation of the global environment.

Social Development Minister Carmel Sepuloni announced the removal of the disincentive among changes to the country’s welfare system (but just a few, for now) in response to the report from the Welfare Expert Advisory Group.

The government will remove the benefit sanction which penalised solo mothers who did not name their child’s father, the fellow who should be picking up the tab for raising the child – or his fair share of it – that resulted from a procreative romp in the hay.

Taxpayers – lucky us – will take over this responsibility. Continue reading “A Green dilemma – trying to square govt support for families with the degrading environmental consequences”

Treaty considerations colour the Greens’ thinking about democracy and the dilution of our voting power

The Green Party’s disappointment at the voting down of the Canterbury Regional Council (Ngāi Tahu Representation) Bill was expressed in a press statement  headed Ngāi Tahu Representation Bill would have been a step forward.

A step forward to what?

Or rather, a step away from what?

Ngai Tahu gave a strong clue to the answer to the second question in 2015, when they shamelessly declared that restoring full democratic elections would be a “step backwards” for Canterbury

The Greens endorsed this sentiment when co-leader Marama Davidson said tangata whenua have guaranteed political rights on a national level but

“ … representation is often lacking or non-existent in local government. This does not always make for robust decision making and in the past has led to significant breaches of Te Tiriti o Waitangi.”    Continue reading “Treaty considerations colour the Greens’ thinking about democracy and the dilution of our voting power”

Why the Greenies may be browned off with their party of principle

When Labour  went into coalition  with  NZ  First, it  seemed   astute  on the part of the Greens to back it on confidence and supply in exchange for  ministerial  positions. The Greens believed they  would be able to achieve several of their major policy  goals, without  suffering the fate of other small parties  suffocated  in the embrace of a  major party  in the process of governing  the country.

So how is it looking less than nine months into the term?  The  assessment is far from favourable:  the Greens  have  scored  enough own-goals to  dismay even onetime champions  like Sue  Bradford.

Any  government starts losing  votes   from  the day  it takes office.  For the Greens, as polls show, leakage of support has been on a scale which could threaten  the party’s survival  at  the next election. Continue reading “Why the Greenies may be browned off with their party of principle”

Greens gag on water bottling consents – but has anyone talked with Murupara Maori?

Hard on the heels of a Chinese water bottling company being given approval to buy land to expand its operations in the eastern Bay of Plenty…

(a) It was granted the resource consents it needs; and

(b) Green Party co-leader Marama Davidson popped up on Maori Television to express sympathy with local iwi who had opposed the granting of the consents.

Maori Television reported that the Government had given approval for “the Chinese bottling giant” to purchase spring water near Whakatāne and export more than one billion litres of drinking water each year.

Actually, it was approval to buy land. Continue reading “Greens gag on water bottling consents – but has anyone talked with Murupara Maori?”