Ministerial appointments – jobs for the boys (but gender balance and diversity are not overlooked)

The government makes appointments to 429 state sector boards and committees every year, according to Ethnic Communities Minister Jenny Salesa.  This gives Ministers several opportunities to dispense favours by making appointments or recommending them.

Ministers proudly announce an array of other appointments, such as judges and overseas envoys.

Point of Order’s monitoring of Beehive press statements to learn who has been favoured by ministerial appointments in April shows this … Continue reading “Ministerial appointments – jobs for the boys (but gender balance and diversity are not overlooked)”

Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)

The government makes appointments to 429 state sector boards and committees every year, according to Ethnic Communities Minister Jenny Salesa.  This gives Ministers several opportunities to wield power by making appointments or recommending them, creating a perception that appointments are a form of political patronage.

Ministers proudly announce an array of other appointments, such as judges and overseas envoys.

The past week’s announcements include a batch of diplomatic appointments by Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters.  All the jobs have gone to career diplomats.

Associate Justice Minister Jan Logie drew attention to the first day of work for a Māori advisory group – Te Rōpū – which has been appointed to help transform the whole-of-government response to family violence, sexual violence and violence within whānau.

Did we miss a ministerial announcement of the 10 new appointments?

An accompanying document provided us with the names of the interim appointees.

The interim chair is Prue Kapua, president of the Māori Women’s Welfare League, who landed another job a few weeks ago when she became one of three new members added to the Waitangi Tribunal.  Tribunal members are appointed by the Governor-General on the recommendation of the Minister for Māori Development.

Point of Order’s weekly monitoring of Beehive press statements to learn who has been favoured by ministerial appointments in the past week shows this … Continue reading “Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)”

Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)

The government makes appointments to 429 state sector boards and committees every year, according to Ethnic Communities Minister Jenny Salesa.

This gives Ministers several opportunities to wield power by making appointments or recommending them, creating a perception that appointments are a form of political patronage.

Ministers proudly announce an array of other appointments, such as judges and overseas envoys.

Point of Order’s weekly monitoring of Beehive press statements to learn who has been favoured by ministerial appointments in the past week shows this … Continue reading “Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)”

Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)

According to Ethnic Communities Minister Jenny Salesa, the government every year makes appointments to 429 state sector boards and committees.

Ministers hence have several opportunities to wield substantial power by making appointments or recommending them, creating a perception that appointments are a form of political patronage.

But ministers proudly announce other appointments, such as judges and overseas envoys.

Point of Order’s weekly monitoring of Beehive press statements to learn who has been favoured by ministerial appointments in the past week – or portends appointments to be announced in the next few months – shows this …
Continue reading “Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)”

Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)

According to Ethnic Communities Minister Jenny Salesa, the government every year makes appointments to 429 state sector boards and committees.

This gives Ministers several opportunities to wield substantial power by making appointments or recommending them, creating a perception that appointments are a form of political patronage.

They can give a job to a former colleague, such as appointing Dame Annette King High Commissioner to Australia.

Or they can acquire a bit more ministerial muscle by being given new responsibilities. This happened to Nanaia Mahuta, who has been appointed Associate Minister of Housing and Urban Development (Māori Housing).

And if there are no new jobs to be announced – well, a minister can always win headlines and a photo opportunity by dishing out some awards.

Point of Order’s weekly monitoring of Beehive press statements to learn who has been favoured by ministerial appointments and/or awards in the past week shows this …

Continue reading “Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)”

Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)

According to Ethnic Communities Minister Jenny Salesa, the government every year makes appointments to 429 state sector boards and committees.

Ministers hence have several opportunities to wield substantial power by making appointments or recommending them, creating a perception that appointments are a form of political patronage.

Some appointments – the Chief Justice, for example – are of great constitutional significance.

Because such an important appointment will be made when Chief Justice Sean Elias retires soon, the appointment process has been outlined in a press statement from the Beehive.  This explained that the process is led by the Solicitor-General, Una Jagose QC, to determine suitable candidates for consideration against agreed criteria (listed in the press statement), and then produce a shortlist for submission to the Prime Minister. Continue reading “Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)”

Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)

When Ethnic Communities Minister Jenny Salesa announced the Cabinet decision to  have ethnicity data collected for candidates appointed to State sector boards and committees, she said the government every year makes appointments to 429 state sector boards and committees.

This works out at around eight lots of appointments each week (8.25% if you don’t like rounded numbers).

But Point of Order’s weekly monitoring of Beehive press statements shows ministers had a lax week, when it comes to dispensing jobs since last Monday. We found none.

Maybe the pace will pick up when those who were overseas come back home.

More jobs for the boys (and yes, jobs for the girls, too)

When Ethnic Communities Minister Jenny Salesa announced the Cabinet decision to  have ethnicity data collected for candidates appointed to State sector boards and committees, she said the government every year makes appointments to 429 state sector boards and committees.

Whether the appointment process is sufficiently transparent is a good question.

Transparency International in 2013 said government ministers wield substantial power in making board appointments, creating a perception that appointments are a form of political patronage. Establishing an independent commissioner or widening the State Services Commissioner’s role was suggested to improve transparency.

The Key Government rejected the proposal and said a rigorous process is already in place for making ministerial appointments. Continue reading “More jobs for the boys (and yes, jobs for the girls, too)”

Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)

When Ethnic Communities Minister Jenny Salesa announced the Cabinet decision to  have ethnicity data collected for candidates appointed to State sector boards and committees, she said the government every year makes appointments to 429 state sector boards and committees.

As Transparency International has pointed out (something which observers widely recognise), government ministers wield substantial power in making board appointments, creating a perception that appointments are a form of political patronage.

Information on the requirements and processes for considering appointments (and reappointments) can be found HERE and the standard process for appointments is outlined  HERE. 

Point of Order’s weekly monitoring of Beehive press statements to learn who has been favoured by ministerial appointments in the past week shows this … Continue reading “Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)”