Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)

Ethnic Communities Minister Jenny Salesa earlier this year revealed that the government every year makes appointments to 429 state sector boards and committees.  The number may well have increased since then.

Ministers accordingly wield substantial power by making appointments or recommending them, creating a perception that appointments are a form of political patronage.

They are also keen to grab opportunities to present awards and – as has been the case with the renaming of the William Wallace awards demonstrates – have no compunction about politicising them.

Point of Order’s weekly monitoring of Beehive press statements to learn who has been favoured by ministerial appointments in the past week – or been given awards – shows this … Continue reading “Ministerial appointments monitor – jobs for the boys (and jobs for the girls, too)”

More jobs for the boys (and yes, jobs for the girls, too)

When Ethnic Communities Minister Jenny Salesa announced the Cabinet decision to  have ethnicity data collected for candidates appointed to State sector boards and committees, she said the government every year makes appointments to 429 state sector boards and committees.

Whether the appointment process is sufficiently transparent is a good question.

Transparency International in 2013 said government ministers wield substantial power in making board appointments, creating a perception that appointments are a form of political patronage. Establishing an independent commissioner or widening the State Services Commissioner’s role was suggested to improve transparency.

The Key Government rejected the proposal and said a rigorous process is already in place for making ministerial appointments.

Information on the requirements and processes for considering appointments (and reappointments) can be found HERE and the standard process for appointments is outlined  HERE. 

The power to appoint was lightly exercised in the past week.  Point of Order’s monitoring of Beehive press statements found only this…

27 SEPTEMBER 2018

Broadcasting Standards Authority appointments announced

Broadcasting, Communications and Digital Media Minister Kris Faafoi announced the appointment of Wellingtonian Judge Bill Hastings as member and chair of the Broadcasting Standards Authority (BSA). Lawyer Susie Staley, of Dunedin, was appointed to the board.

Hastings, a District Court Judge, was New Zealand’s tenth Chief Censor from 1998 to 2010 and chairperson of the Immigration and Protection Tribunal from July 2010 until February 2013. 

He has held positions as senior law lecturer, Deputy Dean of Law and member of the governing Council at Victoria University, Wellington. He has been a  member of the Video Recordings Authority, the Indecent Publications Tribunal and the Film and Literature Board of Review.

Susie Staley, a partner in Staley Cardoza Lawyers, has chaired Maritime New Zealand and is chair for Save the Children NZ and retirement village operator Chatsford Management Ltd. She has chaired ID Dunedin Fashion Inc and been a board member of PGG Wrightson, Tower Ltd and Dunedin International Airport. She was a panel member of the Enterprise Awards for Industry New Zealand and a member of the Performance and Risk Advisory Board for the Ministry of Transport.

The two new appointments replace Peter Radich and Te Raumawhitu Kupenga.