Jian Yang is mentioned in despatches to the WSJ as policies on China are re-calibrated in the West

Around the world, western governments are re-calibrating their foreign policy, strategic and economic settings to China.  Tomorrow the British Cabinet will review and probably revoke an earlier decision to allow Huawei Technologies Co into the next 5G network over security concerns. NZ and Australia have already taken this step.

Over the weekend President Donald Trump says he doesn’t even think about a phase two of China-US trade policy.  Washington has been angered by the new China-Iran trade and economic agreement, although critics say US embargoes are strangling much of Iran’s economic life and this has driven Tehran into Beijing’s embrace.

Foreign Minister Winston Peters has said  the government is reviewing relationships over a wide range with Hong Kong in response to Beijing’s latest restrictions. Canberra is almost apoplectic, according to our correspondent, and its new defence strategic study paints a challenging picture of rising tensions requiring massive spending on new weapons,  but doesn’t say from whom. No prizes for guessing. Continue reading “Jian Yang is mentioned in despatches to the WSJ as policies on China are re-calibrated in the West”

The Brady break-in – unresolved inquiry may be a matter of case not proven

What do we make of PM Jacinda Ardern’s pushback against reports that Chinese intelligence agents were behind the break-ins at the Christchurch home of Canterbury University Professor Anne Marie Brady?

Consider her words.

Four Corners, an Australian current affairs TV show, reported:

Government sources have confirmed to Four Corners that intelligence assessments identified China’s spy service as the prime suspect behind the intimidation of Brady.”

Ardern, the minister responsible for national security, says she had seen no such assessment. Continue reading “The Brady break-in – unresolved inquiry may be a matter of case not proven”