Watchdog is proposed to keep a check on NZDF – but ‘Hit & Run’ authors take a drubbing, too

Like the proverbial All Black test match, the nearly 400-page Arnold-Palmer report into the Special Air Services actions in Afghanistan, is very much a game of two halves.

In the first half, Sir Terence Arnold and Sir Geoffrey Palmer literally blow authors Jon Stephenson and Nicky Hager out of the water for their claims in their book Hit & Run about the SAS conduct of the raids.  In the second they rightly chastise the NZ Defence Force over what can best be described as muddied, incompetent maladministration and misleading briefings to ministers.

For the first half, take this example:

”  …  the principal allegations in Hit & Run about the conduct of TF81 personnel (the SAS troopers) on Operations Burnham and Nova are not accurate.

“First, the operations were not revenge operations; nor were they ‘ill-conceived’.

“There were legitimate reasons for them—there was reliable intelligence indicating there were insurgents in the villages who had been conducting attacks in Bamyan province (where the NZ provincial reconstruct team was based) and who were planning further attacks on the NZPRT and Afghan security forces. The operations aimed to disrupt the insurgent network and improve security in Bamyan province. Continue reading “Watchdog is proposed to keep a check on NZDF – but ‘Hit & Run’ authors take a drubbing, too”

Another hurrah for treaty rights – but what’s the appetite for restoring all the rights enjoyed by all citizens in 1840?

We are wondering – here at Point of Order – which politician will go out to bat for the idea that all citizens of this country be accorded exactly the same voting rights they were given at the time of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi.

To ensure nobody was denied those rights, all prisoners of all races in our prisons should be included in this entitlement.

We would like to think the Waitangi Tribunal might  consider endorsing this idea because today it has released He Aha i Pērā Ai? The Māori Prisoners’ Voting Rights Report in pre-publication format.

The tribunal says the urgency report addresses three claims that seek repeal of section 80(1)(d) of the Electoral Act 1993.  It looks at the level of advice provided to Parliament and the Law and Order Select Committee and the consequent ongoing effects of the legislation on Māori, including the individual and collective exercise of tino rangatiratanga.

In other words, its approach is proudly discriminatory.  It is concerned not with the rights  of all prisoners but with the rights of around half of them. Continue reading “Another hurrah for treaty rights – but what’s the appetite for restoring all the rights enjoyed by all citizens in 1840?”

“Hit and Run” – so who is keeping score of the mounting costs of an inquiry to maintain confidence in our Defence Force?

So what  is  going on   with  the  inquiry    which  the government decided  should be held  into Operation Burnham and related events?

Operation Burnham,  you  will  recall, happened  nearly  nine years  ago – to be  precise, in August 21-22, 2010, in Tirgiran Valley in Afghanistan.  It was  an  action by soldiers  of  NZ’s elite SAS,  operating as a part of the International Security Assistance Force.

Reviews   of what occurred by  two former defence ministers  as well as  by a former  prime minister found that Operation Burnham was conducted with the  highest  level of  professionalism.  Over-riding this, the Wellbeing Government  decided  to hold an  inquiry,  “bearing  in  mind  the need for   the public to have confidence in the NZDF”.

This  followed  the controversy  stirred  up  by the publication  in  “Hit and Run”, a book written  by  Nicky Hager  and  Jon Stephenson,  of  allegations that   six civilians were killed and 15 injured in a raid on villages by the NZ SAS.  Continue reading ““Hit and Run” – so who is keeping score of the mounting costs of an inquiry to maintain confidence in our Defence Force?”