The Trough Monitor: Nanaia Mahuta dishes out $1.2m housing investment to community near Wairoa

The Point of Order Trough Monitor tells us Nanaia Mahuta has been dishing out our money under one of the Government’s many redistribution programmes.

She announced the handout in a statement headed Minister congratulates Raupunga on commitment to housing initiatives.

Māori Development Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta today announced a further $1.2m investment in the small community of Raupunga, in the Hawkes Bay.

This investment will be used to construct a five home papakāinga on the Lemuel Te Urupu Whānau Trust’s ancestral land along with much needed housing repairs.

The land is substantially Māori freehold with some general title land returned to Ngāti Pāhauwera as part of a Treaty settlement.

Mahuta congratulated Raupunga on making significant steps towards its vision of being a confident, vibrant and prosperous community. Continue reading “The Trough Monitor: Nanaia Mahuta dishes out $1.2m housing investment to community near Wairoa”

The Treaty and partnership are invoked as TPK goes out to promote Māori wellbeing

The Coalition Government is making solid progress on improving the wellbeing of New Zealanders and the Budget will outline further work, Finance Minister Grant Robertson enthused today.

Responding to the Salvation Army’s State of the Nation report, he said “the scale of the challenge this Government inherited means that we won’t finish our work in one year”.

Well, no.  Jacinda Ardern said something similar in the Prime Minister’s statement, presented to Parliament yesterday.

“I have reflected over summer on three things that remain true to me. No matter how much this Government did in the last year—and it was plenty—there is more to do. There is more to do.  Even if there’s a summer break, I didn’t stop thinking about that for a moment.”

The things to be done include the development of a wellbeing Budget. Continue reading “The Treaty and partnership are invoked as TPK goes out to promote Māori wellbeing”

Yes, dear taxpayer – you will pay to help people make up their minds about home ownership

The Minister of Māori Development, Nanaia Mahuta, last week announced 24 community-led housing repair projects will receive funding  from the Māori Housing Network (which gets it from taxpayers) totalling $5.8 million.

In the same press release, she and Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister Kris Faafoi announced a new programme called Sorted Kāinga Ora.  It involves a series of “workshops to help whānau decide whether they are ready for home ownership”.

Someone – it seems – has decided whanau are unable to work out if they are ready to own a house without the help of bureaucrats from Jacinda’s Nanny State.  Continue reading “Yes, dear taxpayer – you will pay to help people make up their minds about home ownership”

Blessed be the taxpayer – and votes are the measure of Ratana’s gratitude

Thanks to deft footwork on the sidelines of the Treaty of Waitangi negotiations in 1840 under Captain William Hobson representing the Crown, New Zealand avoided adopting a state religion.  However, PM Jacinda Ardern’s appearance at Ratana Pa last week, along with an extensive entourage  of  Ministers and MPs  raises some interesting prospects. Are we inching towards at least one?

Church and state occasionally mix: witness the government’s contribution to rebuilding Christchurch’s Anglican cathedral (although this was an acknowledgement of its tourism rather than its spiritual impact,  and  came  only after  heavy campaigning  by  such notables as  the late Jim Anderton  and Philip Burdon).    Will the nearby Catholic cathedral in Christchurch, also badly damaged,  attract such generosity? Continue reading “Blessed be the taxpayer – and votes are the measure of Ratana’s gratitude”

Govt will likely want taxpayers to cough up (if not tune in) after review of Māori broadcasting

The monitors who keep an eye on Government spending for Point of Order readers have alerted us to the implications of news from the office of Māori Development Minister Nanaia Mahuta.

She has asked Te Puni Kōkiri to undertake a policy review of the Māori broadcasting sector.

The outcome doubtless will be more public funding for the deliverance of services that can’t be quantified to an audience that isn’t easily counted.

Continue reading “Govt will likely want taxpayers to cough up (if not tune in) after review of Māori broadcasting”